scienceisbeauty:

The march of the penguin diagrams (Symmetry Magazine)

Two physicists walk into a bar and start playing a game of darts. One turns to the other and says, “Let’s make a bet. If you lose this game, you have to use the word ‘penguin’ in your next paper.”
This may sound like the beginning of a bad joke, but it is actually the reason that, in 1977, a certain type of drawing in particle physics became known as the “penguin diagram.” Theorists and physicists from the LHCb experiment at CERN told the tale last week at a Google+ Hangout.
CERN theorist John Ellis (pictured above) was the scientist who took the penguin bet. He did not play his best game of darts that day.

scienceisbeauty:

The march of the penguin diagrams (Symmetry Magazine)

Two physicists walk into a bar and start playing a game of darts. One turns to the other and says, “Let’s make a bet. If you lose this game, you have to use the word ‘penguin’ in your next paper.

This may sound like the beginning of a bad joke, but it is actually the reason that, in 1977, a certain type of drawing in particle physics became known as the “penguin diagram.” Theorists and physicists from the LHCb experiment at CERN told the tale last week at a Google+ Hangout.

CERN theorist John Ellis (pictured above) was the scientist who took the penguin bet. He did not play his best game of darts that day.

unknownskywalker:

Early Universe was a liquid
In an experiment to collide lead nuclei together at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider physicists from the ALICE detector team have discovered that the very early Universe was not only very hot and dense but behaved like a hot liquid.
By accelerating and smashing together lead nuclei at the highest possible energies, the ALICE experiment has generated incredibly hot (over ten trillion degrees) and dense sub-atomic fireballs, recreating the conditions that existed in the first few microseconds after the Big Bang. At these temperatures normal matter is expected to melt into an exotic, primordial ‘soup’ known as quark-gluon plasma.
These first results from lead collisions have already ruled out a number of theoretical physics models, including ones predicting that the quark-gluon plasma created at these energies would behave like a gas. The latest results would seem to suggest that the Universe would have behaved like a super-hot liquid immediately after the Big Bang.
The team has also discovered that more sub-atomic particles are produced in these head-on collisions than some theoretical models previously suggested. The fireballs resulting from the collision only lasts a short time, but when the ‘soup’ cools down, the researchers are able to see thousands of particles radiating out from the fireball. It is in this debris that they are able to draw conclusions about the soup’s behaviour.
Image: Real lead-lead collision in ALICE.
• Source: PhysOrg.com • Two papers detailing this research are available at http://arXiv:1011.3914v1 and http://arXiv:1011.3916v2

okayy..

unknownskywalker:

Early Universe was a liquid

In an experiment to collide lead nuclei together at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider physicists from the ALICE detector team have discovered that the very early Universe was not only very hot and dense but behaved like a hot liquid.

By accelerating and smashing together lead nuclei at the highest possible energies, the ALICE experiment has generated incredibly hot (over ten trillion degrees) and dense sub-atomic fireballs, recreating the conditions that existed in the first few microseconds after the Big Bang. At these temperatures normal matter is expected to melt into an exotic, primordial ‘soup’ known as quark-gluon plasma.

These first results from lead collisions have already ruled out a number of theoretical physics models, including ones predicting that the quark-gluon plasma created at these energies would behave like a gas. The latest results would seem to suggest that the Universe would have behaved like a super-hot liquid immediately after the Big Bang.

The team has also discovered that more sub-atomic particles are produced in these head-on collisions than some theoretical models previously suggested. The fireballs resulting from the collision only lasts a short time, but when the ‘soup’ cools down, the researchers are able to see thousands of particles radiating out from the fireball. It is in this debris that they are able to draw conclusions about the soup’s behaviour.

Image: Real lead-lead collision in ALICE.

• Source: PhysOrg.com Two papers detailing this research are available at http://arXiv:1011.3914v1 and http://arXiv:1011.3916v2

okayy..