scienceisbeauty:

The march of the penguin diagrams (Symmetry Magazine)

Two physicists walk into a bar and start playing a game of darts. One turns to the other and says, “Let’s make a bet. If you lose this game, you have to use the word ‘penguin’ in your next paper.”
This may sound like the beginning of a bad joke, but it is actually the reason that, in 1977, a certain type of drawing in particle physics became known as the “penguin diagram.” Theorists and physicists from the LHCb experiment at CERN told the tale last week at a Google+ Hangout.
CERN theorist John Ellis (pictured above) was the scientist who took the penguin bet. He did not play his best game of darts that day.

scienceisbeauty:

The march of the penguin diagrams (Symmetry Magazine)

Two physicists walk into a bar and start playing a game of darts. One turns to the other and says, “Let’s make a bet. If you lose this game, you have to use the word ‘penguin’ in your next paper.

This may sound like the beginning of a bad joke, but it is actually the reason that, in 1977, a certain type of drawing in particle physics became known as the “penguin diagram.” Theorists and physicists from the LHCb experiment at CERN told the tale last week at a Google+ Hangout.

CERN theorist John Ellis (pictured above) was the scientist who took the penguin bet. He did not play his best game of darts that day.

invaderxan:

The world’s first working laser, created and fired in 1960 by Ted Maiman, was a ruby laser – using a synthetically grown crystalline ruby rod as a lasing medium to produce pulses of deep red light, optically powered by a xenon flashbulb.

Made with a pink ruby rod measuring 1 x 1.5 cm, Maiman’s original laser (pictured here) is still perfectly operational and was last demonstrated at a symposium in Vancouver in 2010.

a closer step to creating lightsabers? 

scienceisbeauty:

Extracted from Q & A: Where does energy go during interference? (Department of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

I thought the question was about non-e.m. energy, though (e.g. jet thrust) hmmm.

scienceisbeauty:

Extracted from Q & A: Where does energy go during interference? (Department of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

I thought the question was about non-e.m. energy, though (e.g. jet thrust) hmmm.

laboratoryequipment:

Invisibility Cloak Works for Particles TooA new approach that allows objects to become “invisible” has now been applied to an entirely different area: letting particles “hide” from passing electrons, which could lead to more efficient thermoelectric devices and new kinds of electronics.Normally, electrons travel through a material in a way that is similar to the motion of electromagnetic waves, including light; their behavior can be described by wave equations. That led the MIT researchers to the idea of harnessing the cloaking mechanisms developed to shield objects from view — but applying it to the movement of electrons, which is key to electronic and thermoelectric devices.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/invisibility-cloak-works-particles-too

laboratoryequipment:

Invisibility Cloak Works for Particles Too

A new approach that allows objects to become “invisible” has now been applied to an entirely different area: letting particles “hide” from passing electrons, which could lead to more efficient thermoelectric devices and new kinds of electronics.

Normally, electrons travel through a material in a way that is similar to the motion of electromagnetic waves, including light; their behavior can be described by wave equations. That led the MIT researchers to the idea of harnessing the cloaking mechanisms developed to shield objects from view — but applying it to the movement of electrons, which is key to electronic and thermoelectric devices.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/10/invisibility-cloak-works-particles-too

physicsphysics:

A song about photons, the photoelectric effect and wave-particle duality :)

FOR PHYSICS TEACHERS

inothernews:

GREAT BALL OF FIRE    Pictured is an an exploding star, known as Type 1a supernova — the type used by physicists Adam Riess, Saul Perlmutter and Brian Schmidt to measure the expansion of the universe.  The trio were awarded the Nobel Prize for physics and will share a $1.4 million prize.  (Photos via the New York Times)

inothernews:

GREAT BALL OF FIRE    Pictured is an an exploding star, known as Type 1a supernova — the type used by physicists Adam Riess, Saul Perlmutter and Brian Schmidt to measure the expansion of the universe.  The trio were awarded the Nobel Prize for physics and will share a $1.4 million prize.  (Photos via the New York Times)

mothernaturenetwork:

New CERN experiment seeks to slow down and trap antimatterScientists hope that by gaining an understanding of antimatter they can develop a better understanding of nature and even develop cancer treatments.

mothernaturenetwork:

New CERN experiment seeks to slow down and trap antimatter
Scientists hope that by gaining an understanding of antimatter they can develop a better understanding of nature and even develop cancer treatments.

roomthily:

prostheticknowledge:

Schrödinger’s Nyan Cat

oh, internet.

HAHAH

(Source: youtube.com)